Tools & Resources

News & Stories

-2016-

International Eco-Schools Conference inculcates Environmental Stewardship

17th December 2016

WWF-Malaysia Launched the First Faith-Based Animation Series in the Country

29th July 2016

Youth Leaders Gathered to Create Path towards Green Growth

1st December 2016

Empowering Future Teachers on Environmental Conservation to Save our Future Generation

8th June 2016

Young Conservation Heroes Call for Protection of the Planet through Sembang@WWF Storytelling Platform

27th April 2016

 

International Eco-Schools Conference inculcates Environmental Stewardship

~ Create a lifelong positive impact on the lives of young people, school staff and local authorities~
 
17 Dec 2016, Sandakan: The fifth edition of the International Eco-Schools Conference took place in Rainforest Discovery Centre (RDC) Sepilok from 13 to 17 Dec 2016. Participated by 100 students and 25 teachers from 27 schools across Malaysia and Thailand, the conference aimed to inculcate a sense of environmental stewardship among students and urged them to care for the planet.


Themed Global Citizenship – Sustainable Consumption, the annual conference was often held in a unique and significant location within Malaysia. This year, the participants were brought to Sabah, home of many endangered species such as Orangutan, Sun Bear, Proboscis Monkeys, Hornbill, and many other flora and fauna.
 
Sabah was also the first state where Malaysian public schools have been awarded the prestigious Green Flag - an internationally coveted award for sustainability in school and the surrounding communities.
 
The conference created a platform of opportunity for students to exercise leadership skills and boost their confidence through interactions among fellow participants. Over the last five years, the conference has received an overwhelming support from schools, teachers, students, partners and corporate sponsors, and has combined learning with hands on experiences.
 
“As the global leader in Taste and Nutrition, we understand the critical role the environment plays in providing important natural resources for our business. We are very proud to be a key sponsor and partake in the conservation efforts together with WWF-Malaysia. Sustainability remains at the forefront of Kerry’s business growth and we hope that through this programme, we can make a difference to the environment and communities we operate in,” commented William Kuek, Director for Health, Safety and Environment, Kerry Asia Pacific.
 
“An understanding of lifecycle and sustainability should be stressed in Malaysian primary education across all disciplines. This year the conference aims to educate participants on the behavioural changes that impact their consumption habits for a healthier environment. They form a strong network of informed and engaged agents of change for a sustainable world, and this is done through having fun and making friends,” said Mr Thiagarajan Nadeson, Head of Markets and Education of WWF-Malaysia during the conference closing ceremony. WWF-Malaysia is the National Operator for the Eco-Schools Programme in Malaysia.
 
He added “In face of global climate change and resource scarcity, consumption patterns worldwide need to change. WWF’s Living Planet Report 2016 shows the world’s population has
 
 
already consumed many of the planet’s resources in unsustainable ways. The expanding human population has led to the destruction of habitats and overexploitation of wildlife. For instance, people are taking far more fish out of the ocean than can be reproduced. Therefore, we are committed to empower young consumers with the knowledge and skills needed to take action towards the sustainability of earth’s resources.”
 
“We create this conference to give opportunity for students to share their work, ideas and passion with other students of different backgrounds. We want to build a community of young people that cares for the environment,” explained Mr Mohd Fikri b Mohd Bakri, Executive Chairman for Eijau Millennium Explorer.

The activities included educational field trips to Sepilok Orang Utan Rehabilitation Centre (SOURC), Bornean Sun Bear Conservation Centre (BSBCC), and Labuk Bay Proboscis Monkey to educate participants on the endangered wildlife in Sabah.

Keynote speeches by field experts were presented as well as workshops to build participants’ conservation knowledge and skills. When they are back to their schools and communities, the participants will be able to lead sustainability activities and make waves of changes by taking action and influencing others to follow.

“Unless a seed is planted, it will never grow into a tree. Unless a good idea is implemented, it will never become a reality,” added Bernadette D. Joeman, Manager of Rainforest Discovery Centre.

For many years, WWF-Malaysia has been an advocator to educate students and the public on sustainability and environmental conservation. This year, the conference was honoured to intensify the efforts alongside with Sabah Environmental Education Network, Sabah Forestry Department, Rainforest Discovery Centre, EIJAU, and SMK Muhibbah.
 
- Ends -

For further information: 

Farisha Zainol, Sr Communications Officer, WWF-Malaysia
Tel: 03-74503773 Email: nabidin@wwf.org.my
 
Chew Pei Jing (Jessie), Education Manager, Eco-Schools Programme, WWF-Malaysia
Tel: 03 7450 3773     Email: jchew@wwf.org.my

We are also mentioned in 

 
 
 

Youth Leaders Gathered to Create Path towards Green Growth

01 Dec 2016, Kuala Lumpur: In these modern times where there is an ever-growing consciousness of sustainability, WWF-Malaysia stepped forward to organise its first ever Youth Conference for Sustainable Consumption and Production. The conference which gained participation from over 70 youths was held at International Youth Center (IYC), Cheras.
 

Themed ‘Building Bridges for Sustainable Consumption and Production’ the conference aimed to enhance awareness and empower change in the students’ consumption lifestyle by making demonstrable improvements in regards to at least one of the key commodities - forest & wood products, seafood, palm oil, and carbon emissions from electricity use.
 
Globally, humanity's demand on the planet is more than 50 per cent larger than what nature can renew. If youth’s consumption patterns fall into the current trend, their future demands for goods and services could not be met as at present natural resources are already over-exploited.

“Recently WWF-Malaysia launched the Living Planet Report which tells us the cumulative pressure we are putting on the earth, and the consequent decline in the health of nature around the world. I’m proud to see young people rising to the challenge that the report presents to us, to help create a prosperous future that the earth can sustain”, said Conservation Director of WWF-Malaysia, Dr Sundari Ramakrishna during the launch today.
 
She added “It’s important to educate consumers, especially young adults which make up almost half of our population, on the behavioural changes that impact their consumption habits for a healthier environment. Wherever they are, at university or once they graduate, they are active consumers, leaders, decision-makers and voters, they should proudly shoulder the responsibility as champions for sustainable products in Malaysia”.
 
Co-organised with Malaysian Environmental NGOs (MENGO) and EcoKnights, the conference brought together professional speakers from the private sectors, academia, and non-government organisations (NGO) with many years of valuable experience and knowledge on sustainable development. Participants were taken on educational outings to show how sustainable consumption and production principles can be a part of everyday life - whether passively through the very design of buildings and spaces, or actively through conscious consumption choices made on a daily basis.
 
“The organisation of the conference is timely as the country is working towards the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals’ (SDG) roadmap, of which we feel a big component on youths' awareness on SDG is not detailed. This conference is a starting point to raise a new generation of responsible consumers who are not just aware but are empowered to make responsible choices in their consumption patterns. With the partnership of three prominent NGOs such as WWF-Malaysia, MENGO and EcoKnights, we hope this effort would gain the support of industry players and government agencies to elevate the focus on SDGs knowledge for Malaysian youths”, said Yasmin Rashid, Chairman of MENGO and President of EcoKnights.
 
Annually through the Earth Hour campaign, WWF-Malaysia calls on the public to conserve and use energy efficiently as well as avoid wasteful consumption. This conference served as an extension to the effort in promoting more sustainable lifestyles and business practices to reduce impact of human activities that cause climate change.
 
WWF-Malaysia thanks iM4U - Malaysia's leading youth volunteer community for becoming the official media partner for this conference. Members of the public are invited to visit the Building Bridges for Sustainable Consumption and Production Fair happening on 3 December 2016 from 10 am - 5.30 pm at Encorp Strand Mall, Kota Damansara.
 
The fair will start with a public forum in the morning and would continue with a lot of other fun and engaging stage activities from various eco-organisations like Project Woodworks which brilliantly crafts watches from unused wood, Babylon Vertical Farms which grows their vegetables hydroponically in the heart of a busy city, and many more. 

- Ends -

 

For further information: 
Farisha Zainol, Sr Communications Officer, WWF-Malaysia
Tel: 03-74503773 Email: nabidin@wwf.org.my

We are also mentioned in 

WWF-Malaysia Launched the First Faith-Based Animation Series in the Country

Selangor: WWF-Malaysia collaborated with Kolej Universiti Islam Antarabangsa Selangor (KUISCELL) Sdn Bhd to launch ‘When We’re Friends (WWF) with Nature’ animation series today. This was the first effort to combine religion with environmental education in Malaysia, and marked the beginning of a series of animations inspired from the teachings and values of the world’s major religions.  
 

“We are pleased to strategically partner with KUISCELL and spread the knowledge on how religion promotes caring for the earth. As everyone is accountable and responsible for the environment, WWF with Nature adopts an innovative approach to educate the younger generation who are future steward of the planet. We hope this early learning derived from the essence of various faiths will empower them to view environmental conservation from a wider perspective and become a valuable part of the community,” said Dato’ Dr Dionysius Sharma, Executive Director/Chief Executive Officer, WWF-Malaysia.
 
Explaining the state-of-the-art medium, he said, “Animation is ideal to reach out to the younger generation as they are more tech-savvy and they grow up in a digitally-linked world. It also contributes to the scarcity of resource materials that connects religion and the environment, and provides opportunities for them to become more self-motivated and well-equipped in environmental matters. They will be able to address the environment based on their understanding from the religious viewpoint.”
 
Echoing Dato’ Dr Dionysius’ statement, Ustaz Don Daniyal, General Manager, KUISCELL, added, “Animation is a brilliant and innovative way to capture children’s attention when introducing new lessons. It is especially powerful in conservation of the environment, a concept that may be foreign to them. It helps them understand the connection between the vulnerable nature and harmful impacts of human activities. With a strong emphasis to narrow this gap, children will learn to treat the nature as the mother she is.”

An advocate for creative learning and a well-known television personality, Ustaz Don Daniyal inspired one of the animation series’ main characters and graciously lent his voice and advice. WWF with Nature featured daily adventures of four friends in understanding the works of nature and their role in protecting nature’s gift to mankind. It was developed for educators in the faith-based areas, and can be utilised as a stand-alone or a teaching and learning aid in the classroom.
 
Experts on major religions were consulted to connect conservation messages with religious values. The pioneer series launched was based on‘Islam, Wildlife Conservation and You’, a book published by Institute Islamic Understanding Malaysia (IKIM) and WWF-Malaysia. It was the first handbook on environmental and wildlife consciousness and protection based on Islamic principles published in Malaysia and narrated the role of mankind in being responsible in caring for the environment.
 
This new approach was spearheaded by the Eco-Institutes programme in WWF-Malaysia which aimed to inspire the Teacher Education through creative curriculum implementation and pedagogical training of future teachers in the Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) programme. Teacher trainees are empowered to take action on and find solutions to environmental issues within their respective campus areas.

 
- Ends -

Note to the media:

  1. All quotes are to be attributed to the designated persons quoted in this media release.

  2. Should you need more information, please contact: 

Farisha Zainol, Sr Communications Officer, WWF-Malaysia
Tel: +603 7450 3773
Email: nabidin@wwf.org.my

We are also mentioned in 

Empowering Future Teachers on Environmental Conservation to Save our Future Generation

08 June 2016, Petaling Jaya: WWF-Malaysia hosted the Eco-Champions Prize Workshop for 36 teacher trainees and lecturers from Institut Pendidikan Guru campuses. The workshop was a prize for the winners of Program Institut Pendidikan Guru (IPG) LestariCampus Profile Competition 2016. IPG Lestari programme was adopted to guide the campuses to become sustainable or green campuses using the Seven Step Methodology from the Eco-Schools Programme by the Foundation of Environmental Education (FEE) based in Denmark.

“WWF-Malaysia aspires to see the teachers of tomorrow bring about behavioral changes among their students, which is in line with the Ministry of Education’s aspiration to build the youth for nation building. Through this workshop, we aim to empower the teacher trainees to take action for the environment by engaging their institutes and local community. As educators, this is an opportunity to widen their perspective on current environmental conservation issues and become better educators, said Hajjah Nor Shidawati Abd Rasid, WWF-Malaysia Manager for the Education for Sustainable Development Programme. “We hope these aspiring eco-champions will spread conservation messages to their future students and bring the Eco-Schools Programme to the schools where they will be posted,” she stressed.

In this three-day Water Security themed workshop, participants attended the Ecosystem Race in Taman Rekreasi Permai, Shah Alam as well as were hosted by Global Environment Centre’s (GEC) River Rangers in River Water appreciation activities in Kiara Park, Damansara. Among the sessions conducted was sharing of skills and traits in campaigning and fundraising to support effective planning and management of campuses programme. The participants were also exposed to ground initiatives where they collected pledges for WWF-Malaysia’s My Fin My Life Campaign and managed to get over 200 pledges on Say No To Shark Fin Soup in just over 40 minutes. Participant Azman Abd Mutalib said he learned the importance of protecting sharks from this task. “We realised that we need to pay more attention to nature and change our habits in order to ensure that sustainability of the ecosystem is continuously prioritised”,” he stressed.

A series of interactive talks were carried out and the topics included ‘Introductions to Ecosystem Services’, ‘Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPPA)’ and Water Footprint. After the talk, participant Kok Jia Xuan said, “We need to be aware of the footprints we leave behind every day for our future generation. It is sad that many of us are ignorant of the destruction caused by humankind. How can we still live comfortably without realising that a simple document could unknowingly bring down an entire ecosystem?” She admitted that the talks had given her a better understanding of a teacher trainee’s contribution to the environment.

Kok’s counterpart, Thevyaa a/p Manivasagam also shared her learning on water conservation. “A single action by any individual, from turning off the tap while brushing their teeth to repairing a leaking tap, is able to conserve our precious water resource for better use. “Everyone should know that every individual is responsible of caring for the environment,” she said.

Ms Johleen Koh
Tel: +603 7450 3773
Email: jkoh@wwf.org.my

 

Young Conservation Heroes Call for Protection of the Planet through Sembang@WWF Storytelling Platform

27 April 2016, Petaling Jaya: WWF-Malaysia’s Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) Programme hosted the second edition of Sembang@WWF 2016 in conjunction with Earth Day on 23 April 2016. The bilingual story-telling platform empowered youths and students to speak and share their ideas on environmental sustainability activities to a larger audience. This is in line with ESD’s aspiration to create and develop young leaders who are capable and willing to change their mindset and behaviours for a more sustainable future.​

Seven young conservation heroes inspired the audience by passionately showcasing their conservation-in-action stories that made a difference. They studied relevant current issues, such as haze, wildlife poaching, shark finning and sustainable design, and had to undergo numerous rehearsals and tests before sharing their presentations with the audience. The content of their presentations had been guided and verified by WWF-Malaysia in-house experts.
 
Ng Yong Zheng, who represented the Eco-Schools Progamme of WWF-Malaysia, emphasised the need to address climate change through his talk, “We Are Living in South Haze Asia”.  He shared his views on the impact of haze from the perspective of a 17-year old student.  Yong Zheng, a student of Sekolah Sri Bestari, Bandar Sri Damansara, had had a series of haze-related encounters and likened the situation as living in a highly toxic zone and shared the need to put on face mask, cap and long-sleeved shirt only to go out cycling around his neighbourhood. He called on every fabric of the society from NGOs, government, business and industries to develop a vision and solution to combat the annual haze occurrence, because it was everyone’s responsibility.
 
His view was echoed by Tey Shu Han, who represented Eco-Institutes Programme of WWF-Malaysia in “Kembalikan Udara Segar Saya” (Please return my fresh air). She underlined the need to think locally and act locally.  Shu Han quoted Wangari Maathai, recipient of Nobel Peace Prize winner 2004 from Kenya who said, “You must not deal only with the symptoms. You have to get to the root causes by promoting environmental rehabilitation and empowering people to do things for themselves.”  The future early childhood education teacher believed children gained the understanding on the importance of trees and its function in providing oxygen and absorbs carbon dioxide through kinaesthetic learning activities from an early age.

Ng Yong Zheng, who represented the Eco-Schools Progamme of WWF-Malaysia, emphasised the need to address climate change through his talk, “We Are Living in South Haze Asia”.  He shared his views on the impact of haze from the perspective of a 17-year old student.  Yong Zheng, a student of Sekolah Sri Bestari, Bandar Sri Damansara, had had a series of haze-related encounters and likened the situation as living in a highly toxic zone and shared the need to put on face mask, cap and long-sleeved shirt only to go out cycling around his neighbourhood. He called on every fabric of the society from NGOs, government, business and industries to develop a vision and solution to combat the annual haze occurrence, because it was everyone’s responsibility.
 
His view was echoed by Tey Shu Han, who represented Eco-Institutes Programme of WWF-Malaysia in “Kembalikan Udara Segar Saya” (Please return my fresh air). She underlined the need to think locally and act locally.  Shu Han quoted Wangari Maathai, recipient of Nobel Peace Prize winner 2004 from Kenya who said, “You must not deal only with the symptoms. You have to get to the root causes by promoting environmental rehabilitation and empowering people to do things for themselves.”  The future early childhood education teacher believed children gained the understanding on the importance of trees and its function in providing oxygen and absorbs carbon dioxide through kinaesthetic learning activities from an early age.

In showing their commitment to WWF-Malaysia’s  “My Fin My Life” campaign,  Khou Jerome and Nurul Syazwani Mohammad Zikri, both representatives from Eco-Institutes Programme and Jessadine  Rose Baluyot, from Eco-Schools Programmes, took the challenge to call people to stop shark finning and shark fin soup consumption. Future teacher Khou stressed the importance of highlighting the significance of sharks and their survival in marine eco-systems through science education, while Jessadine believed in the power of the social media to help build society’s awareness on the issue. 
 
In their presentation entitled, “Give Our Hands to Sharks” and “Shark Finning – It’s not Fin-tastic” respectively, both Khou and Jessadine, highlighted a pertinent point in the preconceived notion of sharks.  The Hollywood film industry mainly and the mass media specifically has always portrayed sharks as ferocious and aggressive beasts that live in the deep oceans killing people in a single bite.   Khou said that most sharks are not killed due to their threat to the human lives rather due to the shark fins industry.

Both Khou and Jessadine remarked that shark fin soup indulgence reflected the prestige of those who could afford the delicacy but in reality, it was by itself tasteless with a jellylike consistency. “The only thing that made the soup palatable is the chicken stock and other ingredients added to it,” they added.  Jessadine revealed surprising statistics on the tourism revenue from sharks diving versus the shark finning industry. “In the Bahamas, a single live shark in a healthy habitat is worth as much as $200,000 in tourism revenue over its lifetime.  In comparison, the meat from a harvested shark sells for an average of $50 for 68kg shark. In Fiji, a live shark is worth $30,000 for every year that it lives. Try comparing that to the one-time value of their fins, that is $150,” she said.
 
Nurul Syazwani, a future educator from Institut Pendidikan Guru (IPG) Kampus Pendidikan Islam, also relayed her view on shark conservation from an Islamic perspective, where Quran and hadith has always emphasised human stewardship and human responsibility as the greater being on earth, and the need to care for animals and their welfares. 
 
Nor Nadiah Mod Najib, another representative from Eco-Institutes, called on the society to stop consuming meat on endangered species and  the buying of their organs and body parts in her talk entitled “Pemburuan Haram: Kita Mampu Mengubahnya” (Illegal Hunting of Wildlife: We Can Stop Them). Nor Nadiah, who was also from IPG Kampus Pendidikan Islam, said that though God has created plants and animals for humans, we were reminded to use them sparingly and not excessively.
 
Muhammad Anwar Ibrahim Seeni Muhammad, the sole representative from Youth Empowerment Programme, delved on the topic of careers in sustainability in his talk entitled, “Engineering A More Sustainable World”. The 21 year old future Engineer from Universiti Teknologi Petronas, who was currently an intern, shared his reflection on his contribution to finding a solution to a “zero-waste” method in a thumb-drive producing company. He enlightened the audience on the basic three-steps of “avoid, reuse and reduce”, the most basic yet significant steps that an engineer can do to promote sustainability.  “In the 21st century, engineers should change their mind set from ‘building things’ to ‘meeting needs sustainably’”, he said.
 
When asked on their plans right after Sembang@WWF, Khou who is also president of the environment club in his campus said, he wants to promote Eco-Schools Programme to some of the schools in Johor Bahru. At a personal level, “I want to encourage friends and families to stop consuming shark fin soup” he said.  As for Shu Han, “I want to plant more trees, connect it to pre-school education” she said.
 
- Ends -

For further information: 

Nor Shidawati Binti Abdul Rashid
Tel: +603 7450 3773 Ext. 6317
Email: nrasid@wwf.org.my

Follow us on :

  • Facebook - Black Circle
  • Instagram - Black Circle
  • YouTube - Black Circle

Copyright ©2019 WWF-Malaysia. All Rights Reserved